Professor Preponomics

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Personal Data Collection – Flash Traffic

Posted at GAËL DUVAL: “Google abuse of dominant position: some facts about the Google Android operating system and personal data collection.”

data collection
Editor’s Comments: If you own an Android smart phone, you are using the Google Android Operating System, unless you have installed an alternative such as Lineage OS. Nearly everyone should be aware by now that Google spies on it’s “customers”, logging their location data, tracking everything they look at in Google Chrome (if you haven’t downloaded and switched to Brave Browser, do it now), and every single email that they send and receive with their Gmail account. You might as well leave your living room and your bedroom curtains open all day and all night, because that is exactly what you are doing electronically with your smart phone.

Read the article linked above. Be aware of the data you are sharing, either knowingly or unknowingly. There are some changes you can make right now that can reduce the amount of data you are providing to them by installing a VPN, such as NORDVPN, and setting the controls so that it is always on, and starts when you boot your phone. Set the “kill switch” so that your data stops if the VPN server goes down, and for goodness sake, from within the VPN interface, change the DNS settings to something other than Google’s DNS servers (which are 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4). Change them to Cloudfare’s servers, as an example, which are 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1. If you do not want a VPN, for some reason (I’m unaware of any reason NOT to use one), you can install the Cloudfare DNS App.

We have more ideas in this article, and will continue to update and provide as much information as we possibly can to help you reduce your electronic footprint, regain some of your privacy, and stop providing the giant data miners and multiple government agencies with a complete record of your daily life. You have the right to privacy, but you have to actively exercise it… you can no longer take it for granted.