Professor Preponomics

Welcome to Professor Preponomics

Welcome to the Professor Preponomics Website. We hope you enjoy the articles, information, important news and resources developed for you here at Professor Preponomics, and that you will visit often. Here you’ll learn about how and why you need to live a prepared life, and we hope you’ll join in the journey. Understanding that each of us comes to preparedness from diverse backgrounds, with varying levels of experience, and with a unique set of resources, you’ll find that we try to develop something for everyone – and that we do our level best to encourage ongoing development and forward progress in every good endeavor!

The Repository Project

Edible Flowers – 10 Fun and Fabulous Books for Your Personal Library Collection

By Annie St. Francis – Reprinted with permission from The Repository Project
Edible flowers include citrus blossom, clover, daisies, dandelions, hibiscus and honeysuckle. Enjoy lilacs, mums, nasturtiums, pansies, and roses. Dream on culinary ideas for calendula, borage, sunflowers, sage, zucchini blossoms, and violets. You’ll be tickled by these delicious additions to soups, salads, teas, jams, and candied deserts. Scroll down through the titles here to a delightful recipe!

Edible Flowers: Desserts & Drinks

Edible Flowers: Deserts & Drinks

By Cathy Wilkinson Barash
Barash provides general gardening advice including detailed background and culture information for each of the 67 flowers featured in her book, and showcases 280 recipes using edible flowers from herbs, ornamentals, and vegetables. Highlights include recipes from 12 top chefs in the US and Canada. Photos.


The Edible Flower Garden: From Garden to Kitchen – Choosing, Growing, and Cooking Edible Flowers

The Edible Flower Garden: From Garden to Kitchen – Choosing, Growing, and Cooking Edible Flowers

By Kathy Brown


The Edible Flower Garden

The Edible Flower Garden

By Rosalind Creasy
A comprehensive guide to selecting and growing flowers that can be used for cookery, both as garnishes and as ingredients. Over 90 color illustrations.


Best Roses, Herbs, and Edible Flowers

Best Roses, Herbs, and Edible Flowers

By Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Roses represent love and beauty. Their colors and fragrance create the standard by which many other flowers are measured. Cultivated around the world for perfume, roses have a sweet and unforgettable scent. However, many would-be rose gardeners believe that roses require constant care and lavish doses of sprays and chemicals. Roses do require attention, but their glorious flowers make all your efforts worthwhile, and the roses in this book were chosen because they are tried-and-true, proven performers.


Edible Flowers: How, Why, and When We Eat Flowers

Edible Flowers: How, Why, and When We Eat Flowers

By Monica Nelson and Adrianna Glaviano
This stunning guide to edible flowers–conceived by Monica Nelson, the founding creative and photo director of the influential journal Wilder Quarterly, and Adrianna Glaviano, a noted food and lifestyle photographer–is packed with information and features lush original photography.

Organizing more than 100 flowers alphabetically by their common name, the book offers in each entry handy reference notes including the flower’s Latin name, its general flavor profile, its origins, and which parts of the plant are edible, all accompanied by a vibrant photographic portrait. Punctuated by simple recipes and short, essayistic moments written by a diverse roster of celebrated chefs, artists, and writers recalling the use of edible flowers in their creative and gastronomic histories, Edible Flowers is both a practical primer and a delightful read.


Edible Flowers: A Kitchen Companion with Recipes

Edible Flowers: A Kitchen Companion with Recipes

By Kitty Morse and Amy Stirnkorb
With more than three dozen recipes, this cookbook provides readers with recipes that incorporate edible blossoms into each meal. Each imaginative dish is pleasing to the palate as well as eye catching on the plate. The recipes include polenta stacks with sage garlic butter, chilled lilied melon and mango soup, dianthus butter, herb cheese, and chive blossom tart.


Eat Your Roses: …Pansies, Lavender and 49 Other Delicious Edible Flowers

Eat Your Roses: …Pansies, Lavender and 49 Other Delicious Edible Flowers

By Denise Schreiber
This light-hearted, full-color illustrated gift book balances edible flower history and lore with proper handling and preparation techniques, and 50+ recipes (from appetizers and drinks to main dishes and desserts). “Eat Your Roses “shows us how to look beyond the veggie patch for great food ideas, and check out our flowerbeds. Hardcover with concealed wire binding. Full-color photos throughout.


Botanical Baking: Contemporary Baking and Cake Decorating with Edible Flowers and Herbs

Botanical Baking: Contemporary Baking and Cake Decorating with Edible Flowers and Herbs

By Juliet Sear
Learn how to perfect the prettiest trend in cake decorating – using edible flowers and herbs to decorate your cakes and bakes – with this impossibly beautiful guide from celebrity baker Juliet Sear. Learn what flowers are edible and great for flavour, how to use, preserve, store and apply them including pressing, drying and crystallising flowers and petals. Then follow Juliet step-by-step as she creates around 20 beautiful botanical cakes that showcase edible flowers and herbs, including more top trends such as a confetti cake, a wreath cake, a gin and tonic cake, floral chocolate bark, a naked cake, a jelly cake, a letter cake and more.


Edible Flowers, Herbs and Spices

Edible Flowers, Herbs and Spices

By Andrew Vecsey
This short “coffee table” picture book in English, German and French presents Edible Flowers with pictures and facts. The interesting, basic and informative facts are short, simply written, easy to understand, entertaining and thought provoking. This book is ideal for teaching, learning and awakening interest for further study. It is also ideal for using as a language teaching aid to learn specialized vocabulary in the various languages.


437 Edible Wild Plants of the Rocky Mountain West – Berries, Roots, Nuts, Greens, Flowers, and Seeds

437 Edible Wild Plants of the Rocky Mountain West – Berries, Roots, Nuts, Greens, Flowers, and Seeds

By Caleb Warnock
From self-sufficiency expert Caleb Warnock comes the ultimate guidebook to living off the land. Packed with over 1,450 photographs of 437 edible wild berries, roots, nuts, greens, and flowers, this essential field guide will provide you with invaluable information on plant identification, flavor, seasonality, history, common synonyms, eating and preparation instructions, and more It’s the most exhaustive reference book of its kind. Includes Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming.


Candied violets are sophisticated and elegant additions to cakes, custards, ice cream, and cakes. You’ll find them surprisingly easy to make! Here’s a LINK to Leda Meredith’s Candied Violets at The Spruce Eats. Enjoy!

You might also have fun freezing your edible flowers into ice cubes for colorful additions to a spring or summer spritzer. Try wrapping your edible blooms in rice paper as part of your favorite spring rolls. Flavor your favorite ice cream or gelato. Or toss the petals onto the tops of your favorite cupcakes or homemade donuts. The possibilities are wonderful!

Safety Tip! Be sure to avoid using flowers that have been treated with pesticides or other chemicals. If you’re foraging for wild flowers, be very careful about accurate identification. When purchasing these from your grocery store, be sure they’re coming from the produce section, and are intended for human consumption. …and as with anything new to the diet, proceed cautiously if there is any concern about food allergies.

You might also check out our post on Growing Your Own Salad Greens!

8 Suggestions for Learning Morse Code – The Universal Language of Telegraphy

morse code

By Annie St. Francis – Reprinted with permission from The Repository Project
Morse code is a way to communicate using dots and dashes to represent letters and numbers. It’s a universal language, and was developed by Samuel Morse, and used as an effective way to communicate via telegraph. First used in the mid-1840s, Morse telegraphy transmitted communications by making indentations on a paper tape in response to electrical signals. Clock style mechanics moved the paper tape along as the message was being received. This is a fascinating part of communications history. Still used today by amateur radio operators, Morse code is an especially useful tool for communicating during times of emergency and poor radio conditions including sunspots and CMEs. Many hobbyists understand the value of preserving this skill, and sharing it with others just discovering an interest in radio!

Ready to learn a new language? Here are a few tips to help you get started!

1) Learn the basic signals, and study the Morse code alphabet. There are many who believe that the study should be focused significantly on the training of the ear. This is understandable since Morse code communicates with the use of sound. There are also more visual learning strategies. Do read on!

2) Practice saying the “dits” and “dahs” out loud and in the correct ratio and rhythm. A “dah” should last about three times as long as a “dit” when spoken. As you practice the sounds, the length of each will come more and more naturally – and very much like the native language we use in our daily lives.

READ MORE HERE…

Back to Basics: A Complete Guide to Traditional Skills – Third Edition

Book Review: Back to Basics: A Complete Guide to Traditional Skills – Third Edition
Back to basics

By Annie St. Francis – Reprinted with permission from The Repository Project
Back to Basics: A Complete Guide to Traditional Skills
 is a concise and yet detailed encyclopedia of information important to the basics of self-sufficient living. Learn to bake bread, build a stone house, develop a water supply, and spin yarn. Raise a barn. Braid your own rugs. Craft a dulcimer. In an age where so much of what we need comes to us ready for use and just in time, it is more important than ever before that we rediscover and practice the skills truly fundamental to life – those that help connect us to the hands-on experience of living each day, across the seasons, and through the years. It’s a knowledge base that is life sustaining, and may also one day be life saving. Perhaps we are being called from the complex world back to a much simpler one.

Each section of Back to Basics provides a well-organized introduction with background and context, important instructions, and illustrations. The editor has also selectively added glossaries, insets, references to additional reading, organization-based resources, and a detailed index.

The editor’s introductory sentence reflects so well the content of this book, and it’s importance: “Back to Basics is a book about the simple life.” This title comes highly recommended by The Repository Project. We encourage you to consider making it part of your home libraries.

Want to see more like this? Check out our selection of great books on Country Living, Homesteads, and Rural Lifestyles!

A Thoughtful Quote to Share and an Additional Reading Recommendation

“At this point in history, our society tends to elevate and reward the specialist… This concentrated focus has brought some benefits… It may also be a modern malady. Specialization, when taken too far and allowed to define who and what we are, becomes limiting. It robs us of our wholeness and our self-sufficiency. It misses the big picture and confines us to a narrow zoom. And it leaves us at the mercy of experts.” – Keith StewartIt’s a Long Road to a Tomato: Tales of an Organic Farmer Who Quit the Big City for the (Not So) Simple Life

We also encourage you to visit our post on Prepper Lists at Professor Preponomics