Professor Preponomics

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We hope you enjoy the articles, information, important news and resources developed for you here at Professor Preponomics, and that you will visit often. Here you’ll learn about how and why you need to live a prepared life, and we hope you’ll join in the journey. Understanding that each of us comes to preparedness from diverse backgrounds, with varying levels of experience, and with a unique set of resources, you’ll find that we try to develop something for everyone – and that we do our level best to encourage ongoing development and forward progress in every good endeavor!

Drought

Drought Conditions and the Important Implications for Food Supply – Weekend Homework

The weekend is here! Hoping you have great plans in the works, and want to share with you a little bit of “Preponomics Homework” to inspire your thoughts, and encourage the ongoing development of your preparedness plans. For our Weekend Homework, let’s consider the greater implications of drought conditions. First the background, and the question follows…

Drought Conditions and the Important Implications for Food Supply

Background: The systems that support and supply our food chain are centralized, specialized, interdependent, and complex. These have become much more so in an environment of increasing regulatory controls, the rise of large corporate interests, the pressures created in inflationary economic environments, and vulnerability to criminal activity including hackers.

Drought Conditions

These systems evolved around the goals of market maximization, cost efficiency, and profit margins. In times of relative liberty and prosperity – uncomplicated by adverse events – people benefited from access to a wide variety of quality foods offered in the marketplace at competitive prices. Food was generally plentiful, and words like “starvation” and “famine” were hardly part of the American lexicon of language.

In today’s world, the same systems that once produced a plentiful food supply for the United States, and for countries around the world, are strained on every front. Add drought conditions to the mix, and the risks of a catastrophic interruption to our food supply go up significantly. In fact, drought conditions not only have a direct impact on agriculture, they also impact other important sectors such as energy supply where markets depend on hydroelectric power.

The Question: What steps should I be taking to secure shelf-stable food supplies? How can I develop or expand my ability to create local, decentralized, renewable, and sustainable food resources? Think about a garden, greenhouse, hydroponics, and small scale inclusion of farm animals such as egg-laying hens, dairy goats or cows, beef cattle, and potentially aquaculture. The potential solutions are many, and varied in size and scope. Everyone can do something! Every step forward is a step toward greater self-sufficiency, independence, stability, and security.

Additional Reading:

Posted at American Thinker: “Preparing for the coming food shortages associated with the dark, cold years” By Anony Mee
“…Recently, I’ve written about the Modern Grand Solar Minimum (GSM) here and here, predicted to run from 2020 through 2053. The trough — the darkest, coldest years — is predicted for 2028 through 2032. It’s a once-every-400-years event.”

Posted at the Organic Prepper: “And a FAMINE Is Looming Over The United States” By Robert Wheeler
“In an effort to raise awareness of the U.S.’s looming famine, I recently wrote, “Are You Ready For The EVERYTHING Shortage?” As hyperbolic as it might seem, that title is not an exaggeration. It’s the future we face if we don’t do something to change course. “

Posted at The Economic Collapse Blog: “Ranchers Sell Off Cattle And Farmers Idle Hundreds Of Thousands Of Acres As America’s Drought Emergency Escalates” By Michael Snyder
“…In my entire lifetime, this is the worst that drought conditions have ever been in the western half of the country.  During the past 20 years, the amount of territory in the West considered to be suffering from exceptional drought has never gone higher than 11 percent until now.  Today, that number is sitting at 27 percent.”

Posted at Ag Web: “Drought Worsens: Western Rancher Relocates 80% of Cattle Herd as 200 of His Reservoirs Run Dry” By AgDay TV

Posted at Bloomberg: “Supply Lines – Hackers Are Latest Threat To The World’s Food Supplies” By Millie Munshie
“…What’s more, a lot of food production has become extremely concentrated in the hands of a few major players. That’s especially true in the U.S., but is increasingly the case in other parts of the world as well.”

Posted at Water Online: “Ask an Expert: How Is The Western U.S. Drought Impacting The Power Grid?” By Lauren McLaughlin
“The most direct impact of hydrologic drought on the power sector is a loss of hydropower. The less it snows, the less water there is behind hydroelectric dams, and the less “fuel” there is for producing hydropower.”

Posted at Professor Preponomics: Drought – The Dangerous Implications of Dry Times”

Posted at Professor Preponomics: “Staying Cool in the Summer Heat”

HINT: Survival is one of those pass-fail kinds of courses. A passing answer shall not include “there is nothing else I can do”. There’s a lot you can do. Let’s get started.

Remain steady. Stay well. Be safe everyone!

If you wish to discuss or comment on this post, or any other Professor Preponomics article or post, we invite you to visit the Professor Preponomics GAB Page. There, you can converse with other Professor Preponomics readers and comment freely (subject to GAB’s terms of service). The GAB link to discuss this article can be found here. We encourage thoughtful discourse as we are working to help everyone learn how to survive the dangerous and uncertain times ahead.

Drought Conditions and Fire Safety — Weekend Homework

The weekend is here! Hoping you have great plans in the works, and want to share with you a little bit of “Preponomics Homework” to inspire your thoughts, and encourage the ongoing development of your preparedness plans. For our Weekend Homework, let’s consider the importance of fire safety in the face of drought conditions. First the background, and the question follows…

Drought Conditions and Fire Safety

drought conditions
By US Forest Service – https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photograph/5503/39/68765/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=62239939

Background:  Drought conditions increase the risk of fire hazards, and often place people, pets, farm and ranch animals, wildlife, and property in danger well beyond what many people understand as their relative levels of risk. Fire can move swiftly, and change directions. A blaze can quickly encircle an area preventing the escape from those trapped within it. Understanding the risks of fire, taking steps to prevent fire, and having a solid and practiced evacuation plan in place and in case of emergency are all key to improving the odds of surviving such a disaster.



Here are a few suggestions to help develop thoughts, ideas, and emergency planning related to fire risk and fire safety…

  • Know the risk level of the area in which you live. Attend as well to risks more broadly so you can help inform and protect family, friends, and other members of the community. Proactively track these risk levels, and monitor communications from local, state, and regional fire safety officials, emergency radio communications teams, and reputable news outlets.
  • Create a phone tree, and be prepared to make voice connections with those who may not immediately receive a text or email message, or see a social media post. Have an organized plan for early and proactive door-to-door safety checks as these are possible. Be prepared to offer special assistance to the elderly, disabled, and those who are otherwise ill or infirm. Have a plan as well to safely secure family pets.
  • Be prepared to evacuate. Keep emergency evacuation supplies in your vehicle. These should include a fire extinguisher or two. A fire ax or two. An electric or gas chain saw. Respirators. Safety helmets, protective shields, and protective eye wear. Access to water and towels. Maps marked with evacuation routes (at least two). A battery powered radio, a CB radio, GMRS hand held radio (“handie talkies” or “walkie talkies”), or a HAM radio. An extra set of keys. Spare eye glasses. Easy to access snacks. A thoughtfully prepared first aid kit, and sanitation supplies.
  • Know your evacuation routes, and have more than one option. Include destinations that are both close and more distant. Remember… Distance to safety will vary with conditions. A localized fire presents a scenario different from a larger forest fire spreading quickly, a chemical fire, or a fire involving the electrical grid or a nuclear power plant. Practice these routes, and develop the alternatives you might need should any fire escape route be compromised. Imagine scenarios that might require improvisation. Make these “surprise elements” part of your practice routine.
  • Review and update your get-home, go-bags and BOBs.
  • While working on fire evacuation safety plans, consider the ways in which you can improve your in-home fire safety (prevention and emergency evacuation).
  • Organize teaching resources and help to educate others. Include people of all ages including kids. Information and training is key to preventing panic, to coordinating an organized and effective emergency responses to any crisis including fire, and to the protection and preservation of people, pets, and property.

The Question: How can I further develop or improve the fire safety plans and protocols for my family, neighborhood, community, state, and region. Is it time to update or expand my tools or supplies? Do I have an “easy to read” written summary of emergency instructions? Have I circulated and posted this in multiple places? How can I help teach fire safety to others, or help to organize community based education and awareness?

Additional Reading:

Posted at Professor Preponomics: “Drought – The Dangerous Implications of Dry Times”

HINT: Survival is one of those pass-fail kinds of courses. A passing answer shall not include “there is nothing else I can do”. There’s a lot you can do. Let’s get started.

Remain steady. Stay well. Be safe everyone!

If you wish to discuss or comment on this post, or any other Professor Preponomics article or post, we invite you to visit the Professor Preponomics GAB Page. There, you can converse with other Professor Preponomics readers and comment freely (subject to GAB’s terms of service). The GAB link to discuss this article can be found here. We encourage thoughtful discourse as we are working to help everyone learn how to survive the dangerous and uncertain times ahead.

Drought – The Dangerous Implications of Dry Times

United States Drought Map
United States Drought Map Image Source: https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

Editorial Comment: Drought has broad and important implications. It is likely to affect our food supply in the near term, and to have pricing implications that ripple through the broader economy for years to come. This is especially true when the resources of households, communities, states, and the country are stretched and thin. Ours in the United States have certainly been so for too long a time.

We have promoted “Just in Time” economic models and business practices that appear to create cost savings and convenience, but leave us without the safety net of stores. We have allowed the world to siphon national resources to our own detriment. We have become dependent on countries that seek and celebrate our demise. Conditions have been made more difficult in the face of eruptive adversities including the current pandemic caused by an agent of biological warfare. We are at a critical juncture. We have no elasticity left. We can no longer avert our eyes. The stage has been set for difficult times ahead, made more so by a cyclical event — a major drought — for which we should have been prepared far in advance.

Posted at ZeroHedge: “One Shocking Chart That Has Farmers Trembling With Fear” By Tyler Durden

“Soil moisture plays a crucial role in agricultural monitoring, drought and flood forecasting, forest fire prediction, and water supply management.”

Posted at The Economic Collapse Blog: “Ranchers Sell Off Cattle And Farmers Idle Hundreds Of Acres As America’s Drought Emergency Escalates” By Michael Snyder

“The term “mega-drought” is being thrown around a lot these days to describe what is happening, but this isn’t just a drought. This is a true national emergency, and it is really starting to affect our food supply.”

Prepper Tips!

Proactive steps can help mitigate the impact of drought and all its implications. Consider how you can participate in the decentralization of food supply, and in cost savings asssociated with food production. Learn to grow from seed to seed. Think hydroponics, vertical growing systems, and drought tolerant plants. Build in drip irrigation systems, and time your watering. Study options for the reuse of gray water, and explore the possibility of rain catchment. Prolonged drought may have implications for insect control, and even dust bowl conditions. Greenhouse growing may become increasingly important as well. There is much we can do, even now, to ease the strain on all systems. Every person who can grow even a portion of their own produce will reduce the strain on the system and supply chain for all others. Let’s get started!

A Thoughtful Quote to Share…

“Houses were shut tight, and cloth wedged around doors and windows, but the dust came in so thinly that it could not be seen in the air, and it settled like pollen on the chairs and tables, on the dishes.” – John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath

If you wish to discuss or comment on this article, or any other Professor Preponomics article or post, we invite you to visit the Professor Preponomics GAB Page. There, you can converse with other Professor Preponomics readers and comment freely (subject to GAB’s terms of service). The GAB link to discuss this article can be found here. We encourage thoughtful discourse as we are working to help everyone learn how to survive the dangerous and uncertain times ahead.