Professor Preponomics

Welcome to Professor Preponomics

Welcome to the Professor Preponomics Website. We hope you enjoy the articles, information, important news and resources developed for you here at Professor Preponomics, and that you will visit often. Here you’ll learn about how and why you need to live a prepared life, and we hope you’ll join in the journey. Understanding that each of us comes to preparedness from diverse backgrounds, with varying levels of experience, and with a unique set of resources, you’ll find that we try to develop something for everyone – and that we do our level best to encourage ongoing development and forward progress in every good endeavor!

Communications

Creating a Home Library — Class Notes

Class Notes
Creating a Home Library — Class Notes

As we work through the coming week, let’s build on the most recent Weekend Homework, continue our conversation, and our preparedness planning, with a focus on the importance of low tech solutions as key components of our critical infrastructure.

The world has become dangerously dependent on information delivered by electronic means. What we want or need to know has been available, at our finger tips, and almost instantly, for more than a generation. In fact, we tend to access information on an “as needed” basis, and are no longer the human stores of knowledge we once were. We consume information much like we consume other goods in the modern world with delivery “just in time”.

In the absence of our electrical grid, most people would find themselves quickly, and quite by surprise, in dire straights.

Many difficulties associated with lack of information are preventable with a solid commitment to, and an action plan for, the building of skills, and the development of decentralized repositories of supplemental information. Books are a great way to begin, and offer low tech access to information, instruction, and ideas.

Dedicated to promoting self-sufficiency and survival, we hope you’ll browse, enjoy, and shop for the print resources you’ll want to add to your own shelves, and shop from our Biblio Affiliate. Here are some great categories to search: Homesteading and Country Living. Survival skills and survival psychology. Ham radio. Gardening. Outdoor recreation. Alternative energy. Food preservation. Personal defense. Home school education. Check out all of these and more.

Let’s get started.

A Thoughtful Quote to Share…

“I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.” – Groucho Marx

Personal Data Collection – Flash Traffic

Posted at GAËL DUVAL: “Google abuse of dominant position: some facts about the Google Android operating system and personal data collection.”

data collection
Editor’s Comments: If you own an Android smart phone, you are using the Google Android Operating System, unless you have installed an alternative such as Lineage OS. Nearly everyone should be aware by now that Google spies on it’s “customers”, logging their location data, tracking everything they look at in Google Chrome (if you haven’t downloaded and switched to Brave Browser, do it now), and every single email that they send and receive with their Gmail account. You might as well leave your living room and your bedroom curtains open all day and all night, because that is exactly what you are doing electronically with your smart phone.

Read the article linked above. Be aware of the data you are sharing, either knowingly or unknowingly. There are some changes you can make right now that can reduce the amount of data you are providing to them by installing a VPN, such as NORDVPN, and setting the controls so that it is always on, and starts when you boot your phone. Set the “kill switch” so that your data stops if the VPN server goes down, and for goodness sake, from within the VPN interface, change the DNS settings to something other than Google’s DNS servers (which are 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4). Change them to Cloudfare’s servers, as an example, which are 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1. If you do not want a VPN, for some reason (I’m unaware of any reason NOT to use one), you can install the Cloudfare DNS App.

We have more ideas in this article, and will continue to update and provide as much information as we possibly can to help you reduce your electronic footprint, regain some of your privacy, and stop providing the giant data miners and multiple government agencies with a complete record of your daily life. You have the right to privacy, but you have to actively exercise it… you can no longer take it for granted.

8 Suggestions for Learning Morse Code – The Universal Language of Telegraphy

morse code

By Annie St. Francis – Reprinted with permission from The Repository Project
Morse code is a way to communicate using dots and dashes to represent letters and numbers. It’s a universal language, and was developed by Samuel Morse, and used as an effective way to communicate via telegraph. First used in the mid-1840s, Morse telegraphy transmitted communications by making indentations on a paper tape in response to electrical signals. Clock style mechanics moved the paper tape along as the message was being received. This is a fascinating part of communications history. Still used today by amateur radio operators, Morse code is an especially useful tool for communicating during times of emergency and poor radio conditions including sunspots and CMEs. Many hobbyists understand the value of preserving this skill, and sharing it with others just discovering an interest in radio!

Ready to learn a new language? Here are a few tips to help you get started!

1) Learn the basic signals, and study the Morse code alphabet. There are many who believe that the study should be focused significantly on the training of the ear. This is understandable since Morse code communicates with the use of sound. There are also more visual learning strategies. Do read on!

2) Practice saying the “dits” and “dahs” out loud and in the correct ratio and rhythm. A “dah” should last about three times as long as a “dit” when spoken. As you practice the sounds, the length of each will come more and more naturally – and very much like the native language we use in our daily lives.

READ MORE HERE…